Commissions

If you would like to commission me to write a piece, please contact me at hocket [at] gmail.com. We can discuss details and negotiate a fee depending on the circumstances. I’m adventurous in terms of genre, so please don’t be afraid to throw your wildest ideas at me!

 

Ego sum Pastor bonus

Ego sum Pastor bonus

SATB choir (some bass divisi)

$2 per copy

Ranges:

Soprano: d’ — high A-flat

Alto: Tenor A-flat — E-flat”

Tenor: Tenor f — g’

Bass: Low E-flat — E-flat’

Some screenshots:

EgoSum1

EgoSum2

To order, please email me at hocket [at] gmail.com, with the number of copies you’d like to print. I’ll send an invoice and payment info along with the .pdf.

Veni Sancte Spiritus

Veni Sancte Spiritus

Latin

For two-voice choir, one part high voice, the other lower voice. With organ accompaniment.

82 measures.

$2 per copy

Modeled largely on Gregorian chant and somewhat minimalist in character, this piece calls for two voice parts, the top one being higher voices, the bottom one being lower voices. But these are flexible, and parts can be assigned at the director’s discretion. For instance, some parts in the high voice part might best be left for the better high voice section of a given choir, whether it’s the sopranos or the tenors. At the same time, large portions of this piece are in unison.

Veni Sancte Spiritus is the Sequence for Pentecost Sunday, though it can be employed at various liturgical events throughout the year.

To order, email me at hocket [at] gmail.com. Tell me how many copies you’d like to print out. I’ll send you an invoice, along with how you can get payment to me.

Here are some samples:

VeniSancte1

VeniSancte2

VeniSancte3

Ave Maria for SATB Chorus

Ave Maria

2002

SATB Chorus

41 measures

$2 per copy

Soprano range: middle c–f”

Alto range: small A–B flat’

Tenor: small f–g’

Bass: Low F–d’

Though there are a fair number of time changes in this piece, it is within the grasp of a choir of intermediate level. The bass section goes to a D above middle C in the soli at the end, which is probably among the more challenging sections.

To order this, please write me at hocket [at] gmail.com, with the number of copies you’d like to print out. I’ll send you the .pdf file, along with information on how to pay me. Here are some samples:

AveMaria1

AveMaria

Jeffrey Tucker: The Day That O Sacrum is Published

This article originally ran on the New Liturgical Movement on February 14, 2008, and concerns the publication of my motet O Sacrum Convivium by CanticaNova.

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I’ve waited for this day for two years, and every day that has passed, I’ve regretted that the piece about which I’m writing couldn’t be sung and heard in every parish in this country (or world for that matter).

And here it is St. Valentine’s Day. And at last–thank you, blessed forward motion of time–the day has arrived when a wonderful choral work, accessible to all and as gorgeous as the great works of the Renaissance, is finally available to all: O Sacrum Convivium, by Michael Lawrence.

Yes, that Michael Lawrence who writes for the NLM. He is more than an author, organist, choir master, and theologian. He a marvelous and truly gifted composer as well, and this piece is his a prime example. It is modern, ancient, and timeless all at once, and bears all the marks of music that is truly sacred (beautiful, holy, universal). For all the genius of the composer that it bears, it is also an archetype of what new sacred music can be, and increasingly is, thanks to the independent publishers who are working to restore ideals in Catholic liturgy.

Our schola has been so fortunate to have a draft copy of this for two years. It might surprise people who know us but the truth is that out of all the music we sing–and our repertoire is vast–members would choose this piece as their favorite. Of all things, it is new piece.

I’ve wondered why, precisely, it works so well. It is not long, it has a orderly shape, its dynamics are inevitable, and it sets a text that remains somewhat familiar to Catholics. A reason that our schola loves it is that it flatters the ensemble. The voicing is about as perfect as one can imagine. Nothing is strained or awkward. When you sing it you feel like you are part of something rich and beautiful, and every singer feels good about that. There are no moments in the piece that almost fall apart. The piece always works to create a sound that is simple but always pointing heavenward.

I’m also drawn to how this piece demands a kind of timelessness when conducting. Essentially you can take it as slow as you want to. You don’t have to force it this way or that way. You just breath deep, start it, and it moves as if by a hidden hand. I must say, too, that my own ear is drawn to the way he handles the relationship between chords and text: clarity without triviality, innovation without experiment, and always deferential to the highest purpose of art, which is not to please us but to worship God.

Recently we conducted a workshop in another town and we took this piece with us, and tried out it on singers with far less experience. And this is true story: we sight read it before Mass and sang it for communion. Can you imagine? This is with a very inexperienced choir. It was just marvelous. After Mass, everyone wanted to know about this piece, where it came from, how they can hear it again. Though I have no interest in joining the copyright police squads, I didn’t photocopy ours because I knew that CanticaNova was coming out with this soon.

Now, that it is here, I am thrilled to be able to recommend it to all scholas everywhere. It might be that very piece you have been looking for, something that can be sung at nearly all Masses outside of Lent, and something you can put in even at the last minute. So many times we have found ourselves without a piece of music following communion, because the lines were longer than we expected, and we look around at each other wondering what to do. Then the whispers are next: “O Sacrum, O Sacrum,” and the pages of our schola books turn right to Mr. Lawrence’s piece.

It is written in D major for SATB, and the entire motet lasts only a few minutes. It can be sung by the most beginning choir or the most advanced. It is also a great way of showing that sacred music doesn’t have to be 500 years old. Great sacred music is being written today, and Canticanova is a excellent publisher. While you are there, look at other high quality work by Richard Rice and the many other composers who are writing today.

Finally a special congratulations to our dear friend Michael. We look forward to many more such compositions by you, ideally an entire collection for the whole of the liturgical year. In this work you are doing, as a composer of music, you are a servant of the faith. We thank you for helping all of us contribute to beautiful sounds on earth so that our minds and hearts can be drawn to eternity and the true source of all that is beautiful.

Coda: here is page 1 of Michael’s original manuscript, suitable for framing.